New grant-writing training!

Public safety grant writing training in Urbana, Illinois

Join us for public safety grant-writing training

April 4-5, 2019, ILEAS Training Center, Urbana, IL

Just south of Chicago, our friends at Illinois Law Enforcement Alarm System (ILEAS) are once again opening their doors for 2 days of grant-writing training. First responders and public safety grant writers from around the country will be gathering for plain-talk, meat-and-potatoes training that gives you the ins and outs for writing competitive grants.

Start talking with your chief, captain, or municipal contacts now so your department can join us.

This training is April 4-5, 2019-a great way to get your 2019 grant efforts in full gear.

First responders and public safety agencies, get ready for 2019 grants

Once summer gives way to fall, we all know how close we are to the holidays… and then to another new year. As we head into the final months of 2018 and look ahead to 2019, there is lots your department can be doing right now to prepare for next year’s grant opportunities.

Conduct a needs assessment

Proper planning involves a myriad of things, one of which is assuring that you have proper manpower and equipment to carry out your basic mission for your citizens. A needs assessment gives you the facts you need to know about how well prepared your department is to carry out its primary function.

How to do a needs assessment

What grants will you go for?

Each year, public, private, corporate, and non-profit organizations provide thousands of grants worth billions of dollars. What programs are out there that your agency could benefit from? What program will you try for for the first time? What programs have you tried for and gotten rejected, but you’re determined that this year be the year you get to the winner’s circle? Remember: Lots of grants open for applications during the first quarter!

Don’t miss another grant

Know and practice the 4 things grant winners have in common

Over the years we’ve looked at thousands of grant applications, and we have seen it all. The good. The bad. The ugly. And there are things that consistently set the winners apart from the losers. Put our 4 tips to work in your grant efforts, and you will be far more likely to celebrate a grant award in 2019.

The 4 things grant winners have in common

Let the numbers do the talking

You can make a well-stated case for why your department needs a grant more than another, but you also have to back up your story with hard data. Luckily, there’s lots of that out there. Demographics, critical infrastructure, economics, you name it.

Get the numbers and facts you need with our resource lists

Train

Just as you train for different incidents, it takes solid training to write a good grant too.

Check out our online training and national training options for what’s right for you

Need help with all this?

Our expert Senior Grant Consultants are a phone call or an email away.

Contact us today

Fall & winter grant training schedule

Before we know it, summer will be on the wane. Vacations will be ending. School will be starting. Someday the temperature might even cool off…

As we start to think about fall and–can you believe it?–the year to come, it’s also a great time to talk with your department and municipality about getting grant-writing training. Since our training is only for first responders, emergency management, and public safety agencies, it’s tailored exactly for what you need to write and send out the most competitive grants you can.

Check out our schedule and sign up for the in-person or online class that’s best for you.

Carmel, NY, Nov. 16 -17, 2018

Old Bridge, NJ, Dec. 10 – 11, 2018

Shelby, NC, Jan. 24-25, 2019

How to find public safety grants that can help your department

Easy-to-follow grant listings show you programs available for your department and tell you when deadlines loom.
Easy-to-follow grant listings show you programs available for your department and tell you when deadlines loom.

Thousands of grants are available, but not every grant is the right fit for your department. How can you sift through all those grants, without wasting time and getting overwhelmed, yet still find what you need?

Like Google for grants

GrantFinder is like Google for grants. Powerful search features help you zero in on the exact programs that your department can benefit from and that fit your circumstances.

Get GrantFinder now

How do you find the public safety grants you need?

GrantFinder search page - Use up to 10 options to narrow or broaden your search
Use up to 10 options to narrow or broaden your search

A database that contains thousands of grants has to be easily searchable. Searching isn’t always as easy as tapping a button, though. Sometimes you need to really refine and target what you’re looking for, so you have a better chance at finding a good fit.

That’s why GrantFinder provides powerful yet simple tools to help you focus your search, including:

  • Keyword
  • Grant Category
  • Funder Type
  • Funder Name
  • Application Deadline
  • Rolling Deadline
  • Matching Requirement?
  • Administering State
  • Geographic Coverage
  • Who Can Apply?

Instead of page after page of possibilities, you can search based solely on what you need and what’s relevant to your department.

Of course, you have other duties to attend to and can’t be expected to be searching in GrantFinder all the time. That’s why GrantFinder can be working for you even when you aren’t using it.

With Grant Alerts, you can tell GrantFinder to send you weekly emails, specific to your grant needs, that keep you up to date.

You found a grant… now what?

Use GrantFinder's Calendar view to show you grants by their application deadline
Use GrantFinder’s Calendar view to show you grants by their application deadline

Just because you found a grant doesn’t mean you’re ready to apply for it. You may need to get information ready. You might need to talk with your superiors, other personnel at your department or municipality, or with your consultant at First Responder Grants. Or, heck, you just might not have the time right then and there.

Does that mean you have to start your search all over?

Nope.

With “My Grants” and the “Grant Calendar,” once you find a grant you can save it and come back to it later.

My Grants is also useful for when you find many programs that could be a good fit for your department. You can save all the programs you want, and come back one by one as timing and circumstances fit.

Search grant funding sources

Examples of public safety grants that have been available in the state of Minnesota
Examples of public safety grants that have been available in the state of Minnesota

Did you hear about a particular funding source? Do you want a better idea of what types of programs are available from a grant funder?

By looking through grant funding sources, you can find at-a-glance details on all the programs available from any grant funding source in the GrantFinder database.

Finding grants has never been easier

When it comes down to it, finding grants has never been easy… until now.

GrantFinder can’t write your application for you—that’s why we are here to help. But GrantFinder can make it a lot easier for you to find the grants that are a good fit for your department. Take advantage of their database of thousands of grants, robust search tools, and saved grant listings, all right here, at special pricing available only for First Responder Grants clients and students:

5 resources that make your next grant easier

Your grants are only as strong as the information you include. Grant reviewers need to understand why you deserve their grant more than anyone else. That means reviewers need to know about your population, economy, geography, critical infrastructure, and any other detail that strengthens the case for your grant.

Here are 5 resources that can make your next grant stronger—and easier.

1. Google Maps

Use aerial satellite views to examine your area for topographical information, look for critical infrastructure, and determine distances between objects or cities. Also use the satellite view to “zoom” in closer to examine objects in your area that can contribute to describing your area to a grant reviewer. Enter an address or other location information in the search box.

Google Maps

2. Infoplease.com Almanac Search Page

The Information Please Almanac® gives you access to a variety of world data, U.S. stats and more.

Infoplease.com Almanac Search Page

3. National Center for Charitable Statistics (NCCS)

High-quality data on nonprofit organizations and their activities for use in research on the relationships between the nonprofit sector, government, the commercial sector, and the broader civil society.

National Center for Charitable Statistics (NCCS)

4. TEOMA Search Engine

The “Google of statistical search engines.” Wonderful for locating statistical information!

TEOMA Search Engine

5. U.S. Census Bureau

When a grant application talks about information regarding “census blocks,” this is where you go to get it. Probably one of the websites that grant writers visit the most as it contains almost anything you want to know about the demographics of an area, from an entire nation down to several city blocks.

U.S. Census Bureau

Need more?

Here’s our full list of grant resources

Start Planning Your Agency’s 2015 Grant Strategy

Public Safety Grant News and Tips by Kurt Bradley, Certified Grants Consultant

Image: GotCredit www.gotcredit.com - https://flic.kr/p/qHQAdt

The end of the year is coming fast and furious, and it’s time to look ahead to 2015. What is your department’s strategy for next year’s grants? How will you bridge the gap between your agency’s needs and budget?

As you look to next year, here are some things to remember that we can help you with:

Review Open Grants»

We maintain lists of public safety grants that can help you fund a range of projects, staffing, and equipment needs. Go»

Grant Writing & Review Services»

Want a final perspective and revision before sending off your all-important grant application? Need someone to write your grant for you? We can help. Go»

Annual Grant Services Package»

We offer an economical, bundled, annual subscription package of grant writing support services for public safety and emergency service providers just like you. Go»

Attend Our Online Training or National Classes»

Whether online or in person, we offer specialized grant-writing training just for public safety agencies and first responders. Go»

2015 can be your department’s year for grants.

Get the funding you need! Contact us today for how we can best help you.

Image: GotCredit www.gotcredit.com – https://flic.kr/p/qHQAdt

Get Ready for FY2013 AFG: SAM.gov, Workshops, Technical Assistance Tools

Assistance to Firefighters Grants (AFG)As part of preparing fire departments and other qualifying agencies for FY2013 AFG, FEMA has released an announcement for the following resources.

SAM.gov Registration Required to Submit Your FY 2013 AFG Application

Starting with the upcoming FY2013 AFG application period, a valid registration in the System for Award Management (SAM), formerly the Central Contractor Registry, or CCR, will be required in order to submit an AFG application.

Federal law now requires that applicants to Federal grant programs have a valid registration within SAM.gov at the time of registration. Applicants will be asked to affirm that they have a current registration prior to submitting their application.

As part of the SAM.gov registration process, every eligible grantee must have their SAM.gov account validated through the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and have their CAGE (Commercial and Government Entity) code validated in order to be eligible for award. These validations are conducted as part of the registration process after the organization has submitted their SAM.gov registration.

A valid SAM.gov registration is now also required for any payment or amendment request to an existing, open award. A valid SAM.gov registration is now also required for any payment or amendment request to an existing, open award. If your department has not yet registered within SAM.gov, you are encouraged to do.

SAM.gov is administered through the Government Services Administration (GSA). Technical assistance may be obtained through the Federal Service Desk at 866-606-8220. Please be advised that during peak activity periods, it may take more than 2 weeks to complete the registration process.

AFG Regional Workshops and Webinars Now Being Conducted

In preparation for the FY 2013 application period, workshops and webinars are being conducted by AFG Regional Fire Program Specialists.

Whether in person, or through webinars, these presentations provide a unique opportunity to learn firsthand about the funding priorities for the upcoming application period as well as provide an opportunity to bring your questions about the AFG grant programs directly to the experts. A current listing of the workshops and webinars scheduled are now available on the AFG website.

Schedules are subject to change and are updated frequently. Visit this website or contact your Regional Fire Program Specialist to confirm the workshop schedule for your region.

FY2013 AFG Technical Assistance Tools Now Available

In preparation for the FY 2013 AFG application period, the following resources are now available on the AFG website:

  • FY 2013 AFG Get Ready Guide
  • FY 2013 AFG Narrative Guide
  • FY 2013 AFG Self Evaluation for Operations & Safety
  • FY 2013 AFG Self Evaluation for Vehicle Applicants
  • FY 2013 AFG Regional Workshop Presentation

AFG has recently introduced a series of videos designed to provide additional technical assistance. Topics include:

  • Getting a Grant
  • Procurement Integrity
  • AFG Vehicle Grants

Additional videos as well as the FY 2013 AFG Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) will be available soon.

Public Safety Grant Training in Guam

Image: NASA's Earth Observatory https://flic.kr/p/bwDohR

Public Safety Grant-Writing Training from First Responder Grants

Are you in Hawaii or the Pacific Island Territory Islands? We’re bringing our grant training to Guam!

Our 2-day Grant Writing for Public Safety and First Responder Agencies training class will be held Sept. 30-Oct. 1 at Guam Community College, Barrigada.

All are welcome to attend this course, a considerable cost savings to your agency as opposed to the cost of sending students to the mainland for our regularly scheduled classes.

Cost to attend: $500 per student. Registration and payment of tuition fees for this class will be handled directly through Guam Community College. For further information contact Senior Grant Consultant Kurt Bradley at 863-551-9598 or kbradley@firstrespondergrants.com at First Responder Grants, or contact Director of P.O.S.T certification, Dennis Santo Tomas, at Guam Community College directly at coronetst@gmail.com or by phone at (671) 788-1537.

This is a unique opportunity for those agencies eligible for and seeking federal grant assistance for their agencies through DHS that are located in the South Pacific.

Image: NASA’s Earth Observatory https://flic.kr/p/bwDohR

How Do I Actually Write a Public Safety Grant?

Public Safety Grant News and Tips by, Kurt Bradley, Certified Grants Consultant

If you are on this webpage you have probably resigned yourself to the fact that the “budget axe” has chopped you off at the knees again, and you are faced with the fact that there is no money to get the equipment your department needs to do your job, right?

That is why we began this service: to offer grant consultant services to you as public safety professionals. Here you have access to a very comprehensive and informative website bringing you a “one stop shop” for information concerning grants for public safety agencies and first responders. You also have access to 2 of the nation’s top professional public safety grants consultants, to assist you in developing your grants strategy, locating the right grant and developing your applications for these funds. We have provided research tools for your use in getting the statistical data and for finding out what programs are available.

Apparently our efforts are working, as departments contact us for assistance every day. We have listened to your wants, needs and desires, and one of the things we consistently hear is, “How do I actually write the grant?”

“Investing In the Financial Health of Your Agency”

All of us understand that we wish to receive true cost-benefit in the expenditure of what little budget dollars that we have. The public we serve expects us to be good stewards of their tax and donation dollars. You have limited resources in the first place, or you would not have a need to find a grant program to help you out, and we understand that.

One of the ways to always ensure that you are maximizing the use of your available budget, is to invest in ways to assure that you have the money in your budget and use the grants process so as not to take away from those allocated budget dollars that you have. This is not something that you learn by having a few conversations with a consultant or reading just a few articles about it. To be really good at what you do, and I believe we all wish to approach our tasks in a professional manner, takes knowledge and a set of tools to properly accomplish the task.

Most of us have recognized that we have to “invest” money in ourselves in order to secure our retirement. We use 401ks and IRAs to do this, which are managed by professional financial advisors to stretch and provide growth of those funds. What is the difference between them and us? They were trained to do it!

“Maximize Your Ability to Obtain Grants for Your Agency”

If you could take $1,000, put it in the bank, and go back within one year and get $25,000 given back to you, how many of you would jump at that opportunity? I know I would! Believe me, I try hard every day to get that kind of return on my personal investments.

If you want to play in the “arena of grants”, you have to know the game. Just as you had to learn how to be a public safety professional at the “police academy” or “local fire academy” in order to do your job, you must also learn the rules of engagement if you are going to be successful at obtaining grant money for your agency.

Spending a small amount of money to learn how to properly play this game makes absolute perfect sense. You need to be trained how to research and develop grant programs that will be looked upon, by the grant makers, as strong applications and will result in your agency receiving the financial help it deserves.

Just as a bank would ask you to produce a business plan to receive a loan to startup your new dream business, a grant maker wants to be sure that your program is going to accomplish what they wish to do. It is not difficult or complicated to learn how to write those plans and present them in a manner so that you do get funded. It just requires proper knowledge.

OK, I Want The Training, But Where Do I Get The Money From To Attend The Training?”

Even if funds are tight, you can still find the money to attend a training seminar.

Remember: $500 has the potential to win your department tens of thousands of dollars in grant funding. Try these ideas to beat the tight budget blues:

  • Talk to City Hall about sponsoring. Tell them that in exchange for sending you to the training, you will also use your seminar training to help other departments with grant-writing
  • Approach the local Chamber of Commerce for a donation Talk with area businesses, both local shops and larger companies such as Wal-Mart
  • Run a local phone fund-raising campaign with area citizens
  • Hold a raffle, sponsor a bingo game, a BBQ or car wash etc.
  • Pass the hat. Got a 10-member department? If everyone gives $25, you’re halfway there
  • Coordinate with other area departments and pool resources to send people who will use the training to help all the departments with their grant writing

Remember one thing: A businessman, and a citizen, loves to see you making efforts to utilize their tax dollars in an efficient, prudent manner. Spending a few bucks to train someone to get thousands back in equipment, means that you are not walking around to them with hat in hand nearly as often. It also means you may not have to be going before their city council every year asking for another tax increase. That, my friend, is sound, efficient, financial management of your budget dollars.

Photo: Orin Zebest

What Separates the Winners from the Losers in Grants?

Public Safety Grant News and Tips by Kurt Bradley, Certified Grants Consultant

Most public safety agencies fight a continuous and ongoing battle in funding their existence. Shrinking tax bases, poor economy and swings from the budget axe all take their toll on departments daily and have become the norm, instead of an occasional problem area. Most fundraising activities, if you are allowed to conduct them, are only marginally successful. Generally they allow you to keep fuel in your vehicles, keep the lights lit and the phones turned on at the station, but little else. So how do we continue to wrestle with this beast and yet continue to keep our employees operating safely?

One answer to that question is through the use of grant strategy; planning, researching, developing and applying for grants. The grants ballgame is very much like playing the lottery. Simply stated, “If you don’t play, you can’t win.” From looking at the recent application numbers it appears that quite a few of you are in fact playing the game. Many of you may have gotten the dreaded “Dear John” rejection notice letters,” and some of you may even have received them multiple times. When you don’t win a grant, I am sure many of you are asking the obvious question: “What separates the winners from the losers”?

One year, I took on 18 departments who had previously had their grant applications rejected for a minimum of 2-3 years. This was done purposely, with the intent of conducting an experiment to see what impact “applying the rules” would have on the outcomes. Apparently my observations about what they were doing wrong were correct. That year, 14 of those 18 departments were funded after using this approach to their grant applications.

Lessons Learned

Part of this problem lies in not understanding exactly what a grant is, or what is required to get a grant. Let’s examine these two issues and see if a little knowledge can tear away the frightening mask that covers the face of this imaginary “boogey man.”

One of Mr. Webster’s definitions of a grant is particularly applicable to public safety grants: “giving to a claimant or petitioner something that could be withheld.” In the world of public safety, it is a gift or monetary award to perform certain deeds or services and to achieve certain goals and objectives while solving a unique, particular problem(s) exclusive to your agency and community.

Applying for, and being awarded a grant, is not just simply sticking out your hand and saying, “I need money”. In that scenario, the only thing likely to be placed into your hand will be a rejection notice. All grant programs are offers to fund solutions to problems that exist for your community, and for which no other source of funding is available. Grants are, in essence, a program or project to resolve community problems. Please pay particular attention to the use of the word “program” here.

Understand That It Is Not Just About You

The first thing everybody needs to understand is that all grant funding sources have “funding priorities” assigned to them. We need to remember that it is their money, and if you want their money, you must address their priorities. The successful grant writer is always the one who can form the proper nexus between the funding source’s needs, and the needs of their agency or community. If you don’t accomplish that first step, you have just failed the first litmus test of getting your grant to score high enough to be considered in the competitive range and be passed on to the next step, peer review. Let’s look at one federal grant program.

In the Assistance to Firefighters Grant, the Program Guidance document states that, the “primary reason” for this program is “to enhance firefighter safety.” What can we infer from that statement? They are seeking to make the individual firefighter safe. Those of you who have previously applied should now ask yourself what was your response to the questions that was asked in the grant application about, “How many firefighter-related injuries has your department had during the last three years?” Almost without fail, every rejected application I read had answered that question with “0.”

Now, if the primary purposes of the grant is to enhance firefighter safety and you answered that you had no injuries in three years, what do you suppose a grant reviewer, or in this case the “computer review” would conclude? The computer will assume that you run a very safe operation and that you do not need any help with safety-related matters. If you didn’t list any injuries and the program’s stated purpose is to prevent firefighter injuries, then why would they want to fund you? The key to this is you need to have “documented” these injuries.

On top of that when I asked the Chiefs why they had answered the question that way, the number one answer was “I did not want anyone to think I was running and unsafe department!” Really? Guess what? In the words of the noted Southern comedian, Bill Engvall, “Here’s your sign!”

My inquiries of these fire chiefs also showed that many of you did not understand how critical these answers are that the application asks you to answer in the front of the grant. People, 20,000 departments just like yours have filed for this single public safety grant program. Do you think that a human being reads every one of them first? No, they don’t! When you are dealing with this many grant applications you have to “screen” them somehow. A computer tabulates and assigns points to the answers you provide to those questions in all those little boxes at the front of the grant. If, in the end, your score as compiled from those little boxes does not reach a certain level, then your application does not score high enough to be considered in the competitive range. That means a human being never reads your request! All of the work you did in the narrative section now becomes moot.

It is vitally important that the answers to those “activity specific” questions are not put in “willy-nilly”. The numbers need to be researched thoroughly. They should be accurate and they need to be complete. You have to do some research here folks; just throwing in a number is a sure-fire way to get your grant scored lower than it needs to be. The decision to fund, or not to fund, can sometimes is decided by as little as .25% of a single point. You need to fight and claw to gain every fraction of a point that you can gain.

Paint a Complete Picture

A grant writer must be an artist. You are providing the funding source, or “grantor,” with a picture of your community, its problems, your department’s problems, and the proposed solution. The problem with them is they lack sufficient detail. Many times I have received grants for review and am presented with what amounts to a black-and-white picture describing the proposed program. What is needed is an 8×10, color glossy, 12-megapixel digital image.

The grant writer is painting their picture with too broad of a brush stroke and the reviewer is left with no sense of scale. Here is what I mean; let’s look at describing a common piece of critical infrastructure, such as Interstate 75 as it goes through Atlanta, GA. Obviously, there might just be a little bit of difference in terms of scale between I-75 in Venice, FL and I-75 in Atlanta, Ga., right? However, without stating that detail specifically, and providing some sense of scale, the problem or concern can be totally lost, especially if the reviewer happens to be a person that has never been to your area (which happens quite frequently). Which of the two statements below does a better job and provides you with some sense of scale?

“We have a critical infrastructure concern with 5 miles of I-75 in our area”.

or We have critical infrastructure concerns with 5 miles of I-75. This is a limited access, 16-lane highway with and Average Daily Traffic Count of over 750,000 vehicles daily, of which 30% are commercial vehicles.

Never Underestimate The Value Of A Professional Consultant And/Or Formalized Training

Utilizing someone who deals with grants as a profession or increasing your level of formalized knowledge as it concerns grants is always a wise investment. Gaining their insight and knowledge on your applications prior to submission can save you countless hours and eventual hair-pulling frustration vs. having to learn through the school of hard knocks. A word of caution about this though! Picking the right grant consultant or trainer is crucial to your success. Writing successful public safety grants are very much different than writing for non-profit or social services grant writing. Be sure that the grant writer you use has a specific background in writing and winning these specific grant program awards; all grant writers/consultants are not created equal!

Photo: Athena Workman