New Hazard Mitigation Assistance Information Available

FEMA HMA

Hazard mitigation projects that reduce the impacts of flood and drought conditions include aquifer storage and recovery (ASR), flood diversion and storage (FDS), and floodplain and stream restoration (FSR).

Additional information is now available to help communities applying for Hazard Mitigation Assistance grants comply with application requirements for these types of projects. The documents provide more detailed information on the ASR, FDS, and FSR projects, the information needed for a Hazard Mitigation Assistance grant application, potential resources, and examples.

For more information, visit Mitigating Flood and Drought Conditions Under Hazard Mitigation Assistance.

HMA and FEMA Resources

NIJ Paul Coverdell Forensic Science Improvement Grants

NIJ National Institute of JusticeForensics grants up to $250,000

Grant Website

Grant Guidelines

Grant Deadline: Mar. 10, 2017

Improve forensic science or medical examiner/coroner’s office services

The Paul Coverdell Forensic Science Improvement Grants Program (the Coverdell program) awards grants to states and units of local government to help improve the quality and timeliness of forensic science and medical examiner/coroner services. Among other things, funds may be used to eliminate a backlog in the analysis of forensic evidence and to train and employ forensic laboratory personnel, as needed, to eliminate such a backlog. State Administering Agencies (SAAs) may apply for both “base” (formula) and competitive funds. Units of local government may apply for competitive funds.

What this grant does for your agency

Agencies awarded the Paul Coverdell Forensic Science Improvement Grants must use the grant for one or more of these 3 purposes:

  • To carry out all or a substantial part of a program intended to improve the quality and timeliness of forensic science or medical examiner/coroner services in the State, including those services provided by laboratories operated by the State and those operated by units of local government within the State.
  • To eliminate a backlog in the analysis of forensic science evidence, including, among other things, a backlog with respect to firearms examination, latent prints, toxicology, controlled substances, forensic pathology, questioned documents, and trace evidence.
  • To train, assist and employ forensic laboratory personnel as needed to eliminate such a backlog.
  • To address emerging forensic science issues (such as statistics, contextual bias, and uncertainty of measurement) and emerging forensic science technology (such as high throughput automation, statistical software, and new types of instrumentation).
  • To educate and train forensic pathologists.
  • To fund medicolegal death investigation systems to facilitate accreditation of medical examiner and coroner offices and certification of medicolegal death investigators.

The types of expenses listed below generally may be paid with Coverdell funds:

  • Personnel. Funds may be used for forensic science or medical examiner/coroner personnel, overtime, fellowships, visiting scientists, interns, consultants, or contracted staff.
  • Computerization. Funds may be used to upgrade, replace, lease, or purchase computer hardware and software for forensic analyses and data management.
  • Laboratory equipment. Funds may be used to upgrade, lease, or purchase forensic laboratory or medical examiner/coroner equipment and instrumentation.
  • Supplies. Funds may be used to acquire forensic laboratory or medical examiner/coroner supplies.
  • Accreditation. Funds may be used to prepare for laboratory accreditation by the American Society of Crime Laboratory Directors/Laboratory Accreditation Board (ASCLD-LAB), Forensic Quality Services (FQS), the National Association of Medical Examiners (NAME), the American Association for Laboratory Accreditation (A2LA), or other appropriate accrediting bodies. Funds also may be used for application and maintenance fees charged by appropriate accrediting bodies.
  • Education, training and certification. Funds may be used for appropriate internal and external training of staff that are directly and substantially involved in providing forensic science or medical examiner/coroner services. In appropriate cases, funds also may be used for fees charged by appropriate certifying bodies for certification of staff in specific forensic discipline areas. All education, training, and certification activities must be designed to improve the quality and/or timeliness of forensic science or medical examiner/coroner services. The grant application should demonstrate that the proposed training or certification is directly related to the job position and duties of the individual(s) receiving the training or seeking certification.
  • Facilities. Funds may be used for program expenses relating to facilities, provided the expenses are directly attributable to improving the quality and/or timeliness of forensic science or medical examiner/coroner services. Funds also may be used for renovation and/or construction undertaken as part of the applicant’s program to improve the quality and/or timeliness of forensic science or medical examiner/coroner services. See the specific year’s solicitation to which you are applying for detailed on limitations on use of funds for costs of new facility.
  • Administrative expenses. Not more than 10 percent of the total amount of a Coverdell grant may be used for administrative expenses.

NIJ expects that any award under this solicitation will be in the form of a grant. Only a limited number of grants will be awarded. NIJ expects to make awards for a 12-month period of performance, to begin on January 1, 2018.

Grant Eligibility

For full eligibility details, see the Grant Guidelines:

States and units of local government may apply for NFSIA funds. States may be eligible for both “base” (formula) and competitive funds. Units of local government within States may be eligible for competitive funds and may apply directly to NIJ. Any State application for funding must be submitted by the Coverdell State Administering Agency (SAA). (Other interested state agencies or departments must coordinate with their respective SAAs.) Each applicant must satisfy the specific application requirements outlined in this announcement, the general requirements for NIJ and OJP grants, and all other applicable legal requirements.

About the National Institute of Justice (NIJ)

NIJ — the research, development, and evaluation agency of the U.S. Department of Justice — is dedicated to improving knowledge and understanding of crime and justice issues through science. NIJ provides objective an​d independent knowledge and tools to inform the decision-making of the criminal justice community to reduce crime and advance justice, particularly at the state and local levels. More

Grant Deadline

Grant applications are due no later than 11:59 p.m. EST, Fri., Mar. 10, 2017.

Apply

Funding Opportunity Number: NIJ-2017-11612. Apply for the Paul Coverdell Forensic Science Improvement Grants

BJA FY2017 National Sexual Assault Kit Initiative (SAKI)

BJAGrants up to $3,000,000

Grant Website

Grant Guidelines

Grant Deadline: Mar. 2, 2017

Test Untested Sexual Assault Kits & Prevent Sexual Assaults

The purpose of this grant program is to provide funding to test untested sexual assault kits, prevent sexual assaults, and improve the criminal justice system’s response to sexual assaults.

What this grant does for your agency

The National Sexual Assault Kit Initiative (SAKI), administered by the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA), provides funding through a competitive grant program to support
multidisciplinary community response teams engaged in the comprehensive reform of jurisdictions’ approaches to sexual assault cases resulting from evidence found in previously unsubmitted sexual assault kits (SAKs). The focus of this solicitation is on those “unsubmitted kits” which are defined as SAKs that have not been submitted to a forensic laboratory for testing with CODIS-eligible DNA methodologies. This includes partially tested SAKs as defined below. This program is not directed at untested kits that have been submitted to forensic labs for testing with CODIS-eligible DNA methodologies but are delayed for testing for longer than 30 days, e.g., as a result of a backlog of work in the laboratory. These are separate and distinct issues.

The goal of the SAKI is the creation of a coordinated community response that ensures just resolution to these cases, whenever possible, through a victim-centered approach, as well as to build jurisdictions’ capacity to prevent the development of conditions that lead to high numbers of unsubmitted SAKs in the future. This holistic program provides jurisdictions with resources to address their unsubmitted SAK issue, including support to inventory, test, and track SAKs; create and report performance metrics; access necessary training to increase effectiveness in addressing the complex issues associated with these cases and engage in multidisciplinary policy development, implementation, and coordination; and improve practices related to investigation, prosecution, and victim engagement and support in connection with evidence and cases resulting from the testing process. In FY 2015, 20 SAKI-site based grants were awarded to jurisdictions across the country for a total of $30,196,409. In FY 2016, 19 SAKI site-based grants were awarded for a total of $24,744,114, along with 7 supplemental awards to FY 2015 sites totaling $6,649,617.

Agencies awarded the BJA FY2017 National Sexual Assault Kit Initiative (SAKI) receive a grant of up to $3,000,000.

Only a limited number of grants will be awarded. With estimated total program funding of $4,100,000, 57 awards are expected.

Grant Eligibility

For full eligibility details, see the Grant Guidelines:

  • Eligible applicants for Purpose Areas 1 and 3 are law enforcement agencies of states, units of local government, and federally recognized Indian tribal governments (as determined by the Secretary of the Interior), prosecutor’s offices, or a governmental non-law enforcement agency acting as fiscal agent for one of the previously listed types of eligible applicants.
  • Eligible applicants for Purpose Area 2 are limited to Small Law Enforcement Agencies with less than 250 sworn officers OR consortia of small law enforcement agencies.
  • State governments
  • City or township governments
  • County governments
  • Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)

About the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA)

BJA’s mission is to provide leadership and services in grant administration and criminal justice policy development to support local, state, and tribal justice strategies to achieve safer communities. BJA supports programs and initiatives in the areas of law enforcement, justice information sharing, countering terrorism, managing offenders, combating drug crime and abuse, adjudication, advancing tribal justice, crime prevention, protecting vulnerable populations, and capacity building. More

Grant Deadline

Grant applications are due no later than 11:59 p.m. EST, Thurs., Mar. 2, 2017.

Apply

Funding Opportunity Number: BJA-2017-11548. Apply for the BJA FY2017 National Sexual Assault Kit Initiative (SAKI)

FEMA Announces Selection of Hazard Mitigation Assistance External Stakeholder Working Group Members

The FEMA Hazard Mitigation Assistance (HMA) team is excited to introduce the 2017 External Stakeholder Working Group (ESWG). Please join us in welcoming the 2017 ESWG members:

State and Territory Representatives

  • Miles Anderson, Florida
  • Tom Hughes, Pennsylvania
  • Sarah White, Massachusetts

Tribal Nation and Indian Tribal Representatives

  • Tracy De Pew, Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians
  • Kaylynn Gresham, Oneida Nation Emergency Management
  • Paula Gutierrez, Santa Clara Pueblo

Local and Regional Representatives

  • Chris Blinzinger, Provo City, Utah
  • George De La O, County of Los Angeles, California
  • Mark Schneider, Cedar, Clinton, Delaware, Dubuque & Jackson Co, Iowa

Federal (FEMA) Representatives

  • Dorothy Cook, Region VI
  • Karen Helbrecht, FEMA Headquarters
  • Jeff Herd, Region VIII

The FEMA HMA team would like to thank everyone who expressed interest in being a member of the ESWG. FEMA received over 120 applications from many qualified State, Territory, Tribe, and Local level hazard mitigation stakeholders. It was very challenging to make selections for the 12 ESWG positions from such a talented pool of applicants. The ESWG reflects a diverse membership with representatives from communities across the country with a broad range of hazard risk profiles, demography (e.g. rural to urban), and jurisdiction makeup (e.g. multi- or single-jurisdiction units). The 2017 ESWG is ready to begin:

  • Opening the channels of communication between federal and state, territorial, Indian tribal, and local mitigation staff
  • Gathering insight into mitigation and/or HMA program issues from the state, territory, Indian tribe, or local perspective
  • Increasing transparency in HMA goals, program priorities, and policy development
  • Helping HMA provide a consistent, predictable experience for external stakeholders, and
  • Delving more deeply into issues identified during the HMA Café at the 2016 HMA Workshop

We hope you will continue to engage with both HMA and the ESWG frequently to provide your thoughts and input on how to make HMA more effective and successful. Please note that the ESWG membership positions are filled on a rotating basis to ensure continuity and smooth transitions.

Please stay engaged to keep up to date on ESWG opportunities and activities. FEMA communications such as the FEMA Bulletin and the GovDelivery listserv are great sources of information to keep current with the ESWG updates. We encourage anyone interested to apply for future opportunities for an ESWG member position.

Thanks again to all who applied and congratulations to those who were selected.

Please submit any questions or requests for information to [email protected].

BJA FY2017 Adult Drug Court Discretionary Grant Program

BJADrug Court Grants up to $1,500,000

Grant Website
http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=290852

Grant Guidelines
https://www.bja.gov/DrugCourts17/

Grant Deadline: Feb. 28, 2017

Up to 40 awards expected

BJA is accepting applications to establish new drug courts or enhance existing drug court services, coordination, and offender management and recovery support services. The purpose of the Adult Drug Court Discretionary Grant Program is to provide financial and technical assistance to states, state courts, local courts, units of local government, and Indian tribal governments to develop and implement drug courts that effectively integrate evidenced-based substance abuse treatment, mandatory drug testing, sanctions and incentives, and transitional services in a judicially supervised court setting with jurisdiction over substance-abusing offenders.

BJA will prioritize making awards to those jurisdictions who do not have an active BJA drug court award. BJA may also elect to fund applications submitted under this FY 2017 solicitation in future fiscal years, dependent on, among other considerations, the merit of the applications and on the availability of appropriations.

What this grant does for your agency

The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), Office of Justice Programs (OJP), Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) is seeking applications to establish or enhance drug court services, coordination, management of drug court participants, and recovery support services. This program furthers the Department’s mission by providing resources to state, local, and tribal governments and state, local, and tribal courts to enhance drug court programs and systems for nonviolent, criminally involved persons with substance-use disorders, including those related to opioid substance-use disorders.

As one type of problem-solving courts, drug courts have been demonstrated (where
implemented in an evidence-based manner) to reduce recidivism and substance abuse among
high-risk participants with substance use disorders and increase their likelihood of successful rehabilitation through:

  • Early, continuous, and intense treatment;
  • Close judicial supervision and involvement (including judicial interaction with participants and frequent status hearings);
  • Mandatory and random drug testing;
  • Community supervision;
  • Appropriate incentives and sanctions; and,
  • Community Reintegration and Recovery support services/continuing care.

Agencies awarded the BJA FY2017 Adult Drug Court Discretionary Grant Program receive grants up to $1,500,000, depending on program category.

Only a limited number of grants will be awarded.

Grant Eligibility

For full eligibility details, see the Grant Guidelines:

  • City or township governments
  • Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
  • State governments
  • County governments

About the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA)

BJA’s mission is to provide leadership and services in grant administration and criminal justice policy development to support local, state, and tribal justice strategies to achieve safer communities. BJA supports programs and initiatives in the areas of law enforcement, justice information sharing, countering terrorism, managing offenders, combating drug crime and abuse, adjudication, advancing tribal justice, crime prevention, protecting vulnerable populations, and capacity building. More

Grant Deadline

Grant applications are due no later than 11:59 p.m. EST, Tues., Feb. 28, 2017.

Apply

Funding Opportunity Number: BJA-2017-11320. Apply for the BJA FY2017 Adult Drug Court Discretionary Grant Program

NIST Public Safety Innovation Accelerator

NIST

Grants and Cooperative Agreements $10,000 to $1,000,000 per year for 2 years

Grant Website

Grant Guidelines

Grant Deadline: Feb. 28, 2017

Broadband Technologies and Capabilities for First Responders

The NIST Public Safety Innovation Accelerator Program seeks applications from eligible applicants for activities to accelerate research, development, production, and testing of key broadband technologies and capabilities for first responders as described in Section I. of this Full Announcement/ NOFO.

Ever increasing operational demands on first responders, along with new technological
opportunities and capabilities, are driving PSOs to adopt broadband technologies such
as Long Term Evolution (LTE) for mission critical data. While access to broadband data
is improving public safety operations and providing new applications, voice remains the
most critical communications capability. However, a true mission critical voice (MCV)
capability has yet to be deployed on any LTE network. The PSIAP is seeking proposals
for innovative R&D projects to accelerate the development, production, and testing of
mission critical voice over LTE networks.

An operational MCV capability includes a number of key functions, and successful
implementation using LTE will require incorporation of a broad set of technologies,
some of which are new or developing. However, PSCR’s stakeholder engagement and
evaluation activities, coupled with the technology landscape assessments and industry
roadmaps, clearly support the need for R&D in two particular areas: 1) direct mode
operations, and 2) mission critical push-to-talk.

Emergency responders have a compelling need to understand the physical environment
in which they are working: Where are public safety personnel and equipment? What
hazards and resources are present in the area? What entry and exit routes are
available? PSCR refers to the collection of technologies and systems that gather, store,
disseminate, and act on location and located information as Location Based Services
(LBS).

What this grant does for your agency

In FY 2017 through FY2019, NIST anticipates up to $30,000,000 may be available.

Agencies awarded the NIST Public Safety Innovation Accelerator receive awards in the range of $10,000 to $1,000,000 per year with project performance periods of up to two (2) years. Proposals submitted by institutions of higher education with the specific purpose of supporting research by students as part of their doctoral program may have performance periods of up to three (3) years. All awards will be made consistent with the multi-year funding policy.

Matching funds are not required for this NOFO. Only a limited number of grants will be awarded.

Grant Eligibility

For full eligibility details, see the Grant Guidelines:

  • All awards listed in this NOFO are open to all non-Federal entities.
  • Eligible applicants include institutions of higher education, non-profit organizations, for-profit organizations, state and local governments, Indian tribes, hospitals, foreign public entities, and foreign governments.
  • An eligible organization may propose to work individually or to include proposed sub-awardees, contractors or other collaborators.
  • Please note that individuals and unincorporated sole proprietors are not considered “non-Federal entities” and are not eligible apply under this NOFO.
  • NIST will only consider one application per applicant; however, an applicant entity may be proposed as a sub-recipient, contractor, or unfunded collaborator within applications submitted by other entities.
  • In addition, an applicant may address more than one technology area from the program description, though they should make this very clear in the technical proposal.

About the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) was founded in 1901 and now part of the U.S. Department of Commerce. NIST is one of the nation’s oldest physical science laboratories… More

Grant Deadline

Grant applications are due no later than 11:59 p.m., Tues., Feb. 28, 2017.

Apply

Funding Opportunity Number: 2017-NIST-PSIAP-01. Apply for the NIST Public Safety Innovation Accelerator

OVC FY2017 Comprehensive Services for Victims of All Forms of Human Trafficking

OVC

Total cooperative agreement funding $10,000,000

Grant Website

Grant Guidelines

Deadline: Feb. 21, 2017

Up to 13 awards of up to $750,000

The primary goal of this FY16 program is to enhance the quality and quantity of services available to assist victims of all forms of human trafficking, as defined by the Trafficking Victims Protection Act (TVPA) of 2000, as amended, by enhancing interagency collaboration and the coordinated community response to victims of human trafficking, and through the provision of high-quality services that address the individual needs of trafficking victims.

This solicitation will provide funding to victim service organizations with a demonstrated history of providing services for victims of human trafficking. Funding under this program will support comprehensive services for all victims of human trafficking:

  • sex trafficking
  • labor trafficking
  • foreign national/U.S. citizen/legal permanent resident (LPR)
  • adult/minor
  • male/female, and
  • LGBTQ victims of trafficking, among others

Funding will also support efforts to increase the capacity of communities to respond to human trafficking victims through the development of interagency partnerships, professional training, and public awareness activities.

What this grant does for your agency

OVC will make up to 13 awards of up to $750,000 to enhance the quality and quantity of services available to assist victims of all forms of human trafficking by enhancing interagency collaboration and the coordinated community response to victims of human trafficking, and by providing high-quality services that address the individual needs of trafficking victims. Funding will be provided to victim service organizations with a demonstrated history of providing services for victims of human trafficking; will support comprehensive services for all victims of human trafficking; and will aid efforts to increase the capacity of communities to respond to human trafficking victims through the development of interagency partnerships, professional training, and public awareness activities.

Agencies awarded the OVC FY2017 Comprehensive Services for Victims of All Forms of Human Trafficking receive awards up to $750,000.

Only a limited number of grants will be awarded.

Grant Eligibility

For full eligibility details, see the Grant Guidelines:

  • By statute, grants under this program may be awarded to states, units of local government, federally recognized Indian tribal governments (as determined by the Secretary of the Interior), and nonprofit, nongovernmental organizations (including tribal nonprofits).
  • For the purposes of this program, a unit of local government is any city, county, township, town, borough, parish, village, or other general purpose political subdivision of a state, territory, or federally recognized Indian tribal government.
  • Organizations with a demonstrated history of providing victim assistance, social services, legal services, shelter, or mental health services for victims of human trafficking are eligible to apply.
  • OVC may elect to make awards for applications submitted under this solicitation in future fiscal years, dependent on, among other considerations, the merit of the applications and the availability of appropriations.
  • OVC welcomes applications under which two or more entities would carry out the federal award; however, only one entity may be the applicant.
  • Current OVC trafficking victim services grantees who received funding from the OVC FY 2016 Comprehensive Services for Victims of Human Trafficking solicitation or the OVC FY 2016 Enhanced Collaborative Model to Combat Human Trafficking solicitation are not eligible to apply for funding under this solicitation.
  • Nonprofit organizations that hold money in offshore accounts for the purpose of avoiding paying the tax described in 26 U.S.C. § 511(a) are not eligible to apply.

About the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC)

OVC administers the Crime Victims Fund (the Fund), which is financed by fines and penalties paid by convicted federal offenders, not from tax dollars. Federal revenues deposited into the Fund also come from gifts, donations, and bequests by private parties. OVC channels funding for victim compensation and assistance throughout the United States, raises awareness about victims’ issues, promotes compliance with victims’ rights laws, and provides training and technical assistance and publications and products to victim assistance professionals. More

Grant Deadline

Grant applications are due no later than 11:59 p.m. EST, Tues., Feb. 21, 2017.

Apply

Funding Opportunity Number: OVC-2017-11573. Apply for the OVC FY2017 Comprehensive Services for Victims of All Forms of Human Trafficking

BJA FY2017 Safeguarding Children of Arrested Parents CAP

BJATraining, Technical Assistance and Outreach Program

Grant Website

Grant Guidelines

Deadline: Feb. 16, 2017

1 award up to $300,000 for a 24-month project period

The arrest of a parent can have a significant impact on children, whether such children are present or not, and can often lead to feelings of shock, fear, anxiety, anger and resentment. Many law enforcement organizations do not have specific policies, procedures, or training that are intended to specifically address practices that could mitigate the potential of creating trauma associated with a parent’s arrest and/or other investigation actions carried out by law enforcement.

The Safeguarding Children of Arrested Parents (CAP) Model Policy was developed in
collaboration with the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP), National Policy Center, in recognition of the need to address the impact of adverse childhood experiences that increase children’s risk of negative outcomes in adulthood. It has been recognized that law enforcement organizations across the nation, when pursuing their investigative and enforcement activities, may unintentionally contribute to stresses on children, creating trauma and furthering the potential of negative outcomes for these children as they enter adolescence and adulthood.

The CAP program concepts and model policy are substantially based on the principles of
trauma-informed care and are informed by subject matter experts well versed in this arena from agencies such as the National Resource Center on Children and Families of the Incarcerated at Rutgers University; the Administration for Children, Youth, and Families; the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; the Osborne Association; the Urban Institute; the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention; and the National Center for Children Exposed to Violence at Yale University, among others. To learn more about the relevant research, visit the CAP program page.

Funding under this program will support outreach efforts, training and technical assistance (TTA) to state, local, territorial, and tribal jurisdictions. The focus is to further inform law enforcement and partner agencies about the CAP Model Policy, and help law enforcement agencies to institute relevant policies and procedures that are intended to reduce the exposure of children to trauma that may be created when a parent is taken into custody.

What this grant does for your agency

The CAP TTA and Outreach Program will deliver strategic training and technical assistance (TTA) as well as to support outreach efforts intended to inform law enforcement agencies and partner organizations about this Model Policy and the available resources, all intended to enhance law enforcement planning, processes and procedures intended to lead to better outcomes for the children of arrested parents. These efforts will require a multidisciplinary response, involving law enforcement agencies, child and human services organizations, educational institutions, courts, corrections, and other stakeholders groups.

BJA estimates it will make one award of no more than $300,000 for a 24-month project period, beginning on or before October 1, 2017.

BJA expects that any award under this solicitation will be made in the form of a cooperative agreement, which is a type of award that provides for OJP to have substantial involvement in carrying out award activities.

To meet the funding source eligibility requirements:

  • Applicants must articulate their knowledge, experience, and capabilities in delivering national TTA and outreach in criminal justice program areas, which may also include non-justice or non-traditional stakeholders.
  • Applicants must identify their plan to meet all the requirements of the solicitation for conducting nationwide TTA; conducting outreach to inform law enforcement agencies about the CAP Model Policy; and providing assistance with the implementation of the Model Policy across the nation.
  • As a component of the outreach, applicants must describe their strategy for providing additional content to support the CAP Program webpage: www.BJA.gov/CAP. TTA may
    be delivered to state, local and tribal law enforcement agencies, and to stakeholder
    organizations partnering with the law enforcement agencies.
  • Priority consideration will be given to applicants that demonstrate TTA and outreach expertise, and that propose comprehensive plans that include coordination among multiple stakeholder groups, and identify strategies intended to foster a shared commitment by government and stakeholder organizations alike.

Grant Eligibility

For full eligibility details, see the Grant Guidelines:

  • Eligible applicants are limited to state, local, regional units of government, for-profit
    (commercial) organizations, nonprofit organizations (including tribal non- and for-profit
    organizations), faith-based and community organizations and institutions of higher education (including tribal institutions of higher education), Indian tribal organizations, and consortiums of subject matter experts, all with demonstrated experience providing national and local level training and technical assistance in this area.
  • For-profit organizations (as well as other recipients) must forgo any profit or management fee.

About the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA)

BJA’s mission is to provide leadership and services in grant administration and criminal justice policy development to support local, state, and tribal justice strategies to achieve safer communities. BJA supports programs and initiatives in the areas of law enforcement, justice information sharing, countering terrorism, managing offenders, combating drug crime and abuse, adjudication, advancing tribal justice, crime prevention, protecting vulnerable populations, and capacity building. More

Grant Deadline

Grant applications are due no later than 11:59 p.m. EST, Thurs., Feb. 16, 2017.

Apply

Funding Opportunity Number: BJA-2017-11401. Apply for the BJA FY2017 Safeguarding Children of Arrested Parents CAP

FY2016 Fire Prevention and Safety (FPS) Grants Opens Soon

Fire Prevention & Safety (FP&S) GrantsThe FY2016 FP&S application period is right around the corner. The open application period dates will be released as soon as the information becomes available.

Start planning your FY 2016 FPS Grant application now by reviewing the technical assistance tools below. These tools were produced specifically to help potential applicants begin to plan their 2016 applications ahead of the application period. The tools can be viewed on the AFG website or downloaded to your computer.

FY 2016 Fire Prevention & Safety Application Assistance Tools

These and other tools are available to help you with your FP&S grant application:

  • Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO) – COMING SOON
  • FY 2016 FP&S Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) – COMING SOON
  • Application Checklist: This checklist will help you prepare to answer general administrative questions in your FP&S grant application
  • Self-Evaluation Guide: FP&S Applicants – Assess your readiness to apply. This tool will help you prepare information needed to answer the evaluation criteria within the application.
  • FP&S Cost Share Calculator

Go to FY 2016 Fire Prevention & Safety Application Assistance:

FP&S Grants Help Desk: If you have questions about the NOFO or technical assistance tools listed, call or email the FP&S Grants help Desk. The toll-free number is 1-866-274-0960; the e-mail address for questions is [email protected].