FY2018 COPS Anti-Methamphetamine Program (CAMP)

COPSCombat illegal methamphetamine manufacture and distribution

Grant Website

Grant Guidelines

Grant Deadline: Applications are due by June 27, 2018 at 7:59 PM EDT.

Grants up to $2 million

The 2018 COPS Anti-Methamphetamine Program is a competitive grant program that advances public safety by providing funds directly to state law enforcement agencies to investigate illicit activities related to the manufacture and distribution of methamphetamine.

What this grant does for your agency

CAMP funds must be used to investigate illicit activities related to the manufacture and distribution of methamphetamine (including precursor diversion, laboratories, or methamphetamine traffickers).

This solicitation will be very competitive. Agencies that plan to participate in anti-methamphetamine task forces with multijurisdictional reach and interdisciplinary team structures will be given additional consideration.

Approximately $8 million in funding is available for FY 2018 CAMP. Each grant is two years (24 months) in duration, and there is no local match. Each grant recipient may receive a maximum of $2 million.

Only a limited number of grants will be awarded.

Grant Eligibility

The fiscal year (FY) 2018 COPS Anti-Methamphetamine Program (CAMP) is a competitive award program with a focus on advancing public safety by providing funds to investigate illicit activities related to the manufacture and distribution of methamphetamine. CAMP provides funding directly to state law enforcement agencies in states with high seizures of precursor chemicals, finished methamphetamine, laboratories, and laboratory dump seizures for the purpose of locating and investigating illicit activities including precursor diversion, laboratories, or methamphetamine traffickers. Only state law enforcement agencies authorized by law or by a state agency to engage in or to supervise anti-methamphetamine investigative activities are eligible to apply for funding. Additional consideration will be given to agencies participating in anti-methamphetamine task forces with multijurisdictional reach and interdisciplinary team structures. All awards are subject to the availability of appropriated funds and any modifications or additional requirements that may be imposed by law.

About the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS Office)

The Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS Office) is the component of the U.S. Department of Justice responsible for advancing the practice of community policing by the nation’s state, local, territorial, and tribal law enforcement agencies through information and grant resources. More

Grant Deadline

Applications are due by June 27, 2018 at 7:59 PM EDT.

Apply

Apply for the FY2018 COPS Anti-Methamphetamine Program (CAMP)

FY2018 COPS Anti-Heroin Task Force (AHTF) Program

COPSCombat heroin, unlawful opoid distribution

Grant Website

Grant Guidelines

Grant Deadline: Applications are due by June 27, 2018 at 7:59 PM EDT

Grants up to $3 million

The 2018 Anti-Heroin Task Force Program is a competitive grant program that assists state law enforcement agencies in states with high per capita levels of primary treatment admissions for both heroin and other opioids. AHTF funds shall be used for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities related to the distribution of heroin or unlawful distribution of prescription opioids.

What this grant does for your agency

AHTF provides funding for 24 months directly to state law enforcement agencies with high rates of primary treatment admissions for heroin and other opioids. AHTF funds awarded in this program shall be used for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including activities related to the distribution of heroin or unlawful distribution of prescription opioids or unlawful diversion and distribution of prescription opioids.

AHTF will be open to state law enforcement agencies with multi-jurisdictional reach and an interdisciplinary team (e.g., task force) structures.

These state law enforcement agencies must have primary law enforcement authority over heroin and other opioids seizures.

The COPS Office anticipates making approximately 10 2018 AHTF awards for a total of approximately $32,000,000. Funding requests under this program will be capped at $3,000,000 per award.

Only a limited number of grants will be awarded.

Grant Eligibility

For full eligibility details, see the Grant Guidelines:

The fiscal year (FY) 2018 COPS Anti-Heroin Task Force Program (AHTF) is a competitive program with a focus on advancing public safety by providing funds to investigate illicit activities related to the distribution of heroin or unlawful distribution of prescription opioids, or unlawful heroin and prescription opioid traffickers through statewide collaboration. AHTF funds awarded in this program shall be used for investigative purposes to locate or investigate illicit activities, including activities related to the distribution of heroin or unlawful distribution of prescription opioids or unlawful diversion and distribution of prescription opioids. AHTF will be open to state law enforcement agencies with multijurisdictional reach and an interdisciplinary team (e.g. task force) structures. These state law enforcement agencies must have primary law enforcement authority over heroin and other opioids seizures.

About the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS Office)

The Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS Office) is the component of the U.S. Department of Justice responsible for advancing the practice of community policing by the nation’s state, local, territorial, and tribal law enforcement agencies through information and grant resources. More

Grant Deadline

Applications are due by June 27, 2018 at 7:59 PM EDT.

Apply

Apply for the 2018 COPS Anti-Heroin Task Force (AHTF) Program

The letter you must send to SAM.gov now

SAM.govRegistration process changes in SAM.gov in effect

What’s changed

Beginning on April 27, 2018, ALL entities renewing or updating their registration at www.SAM.gov will be required to submit an original, signed notarized letter confirming the authorized Entity Administrator associated with the DUNS number before the registration is activated.

As a reminder, FEMA will not make an award to an entity until the entity has complied with the requirements to provide a valid DUNS number and maintain an active SAM registration with current information. If the applicant is noncompliant with this requirement at the time of award offer, then FEMA will determine the applicant is not qualified to receive an award

What are the circumstances behind the SAM.gov process changes?

The General Services Administration’s System for Award Management (SAM) is supporting an active investigation by the Office of Inspector General (OIG) into alleged, third party fraudulent activity in SAM. At this time, only a limited number of entities registered in SAM are suspected of being impacted by this fraudulent activity and have been notified.

What changes have been made to the SAM.gov registration process?

The proactive steps taken by SAM to address this fraudulent activity include requiring an original, signed notarized letter identifying the authorized Entity Administrator for the entity associated with the DUNS number before a new SAM.gov entity registration will be activated or an existing entity is updated or renewed.

GSA posted instructions for domestic entities and instructions for international entities for easy reference. Notarized letters must be submitted via U.S. Postal Service Mail. No electronic submissions are being accepted.

What should entities registered in SAM.gov do to protect themselves and confirm that their bank account information has not been changed?

Entities registered in SAM are advised to log into SAM and review their registration information, particularly their bank account information for Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT) on the financial information page.

Contact the supporting Federal Service Desk at www.fsd.gov, or by telephone at 866-606-8220 (toll free) or 334-206-7828 (internationally) Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. (EDT), for FREE assistance.

Entities are responsible for ensuring that their information is current and correct in SAM in accordance with paragraph (b) of Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) clause 52.232-33 or Title 2 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 25 (2 CFR § 25.310 and Appendix A), as applicable, and should routinely review such information for accuracy.

For further information read the SAM Alert at https://www.sam.gov.

To learn more about what is required in the notarized letter and mailing address, read the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) at https://www.gsa.gov/samupdate.

Senate Approves Firefighter Cancer Registry Act

Congressional Fire Services Institute (CFSI)Bipartisan legislation is making its way through Congress: the Firefighter Cancer Registry Act is intended to create a national registry to aid in monitoring cancer occurrences in firefighters nationwide.

The Senate’s amended bill now goes to the House.

Full story: Senate Approves Firefighter Cancer Registry Act – Congressional Fire Services Institute

COPS Community Policing Development (CPD) Program

COPSUp to $10 million for community policing

Grant Website

Grant Guidelines

Grant Deadline: June 7, 2018, 7:59 PM EDT

Develop and implement community policing programs in your jurisdiction

The 2018 Community Policing Development Program is a competitive grant program designed to advance the practice of community policing in law enforcement agencies through:

  • training and technical assistance
  • the development of innovative community policing strategies
  • field-directed law enforcement microgrants
  • guidebooks, and
  • best practices that are national in scope

The COPS Office, a federal provider of innovative, customer-focused resources that address the continuing and emerging needs of those engaged in enhancing public safety through community policing, has designed the CPD solicitation to address critical topics in the law enforcement field by building on the principles of community policing.

What this grant does for your agency

Community Policing Development (CPD) funds are used to develop the capacity of law enforcement to implement community policing strategies by providing guidance on promising practices through the development and testing of innovative strategies; building knowledge about effective practices and outcomes; and supporting new, creative approaches to preventing crime and promoting safe communities. The 2018 CPD program will fund projects that develop knowledge, increase awareness of effective community policing strategies, increase the skills and abilities of law enforcement and community partners, increase the number of law enforcement agencies and relevant stakeholders using proven community policing practices and institutionalize community policing practice in routine business.

Agencies awarded the COPS Community Policing Development (CPD) Program receive funds for projects related to the following topic areas:

  • Incorporating Community Policing into Contemporary Broken Windows Theory Applications
  • Supporting First Amendment Rights: The Community Policing Approach
  • Partnerships to Address Labor Trafficking
  • Online Law Enforcement Training
  • Supporting First-Line Supervisors
  • Field-Initiated Law Enforcement Microgrants
    • Peer Support for Officer Safety and Wellness
    • Human Trafficking
    • Hate Crimes
    • Recruitment and Hiring
    • Incident-Specific After-Action Reviews
    • Child and Youth Engagement
  • Open Topic Area
  • Tribal Training and Technical Assistance

Only a limited number of grants will be awarded.

Grant Eligibility

For full eligibility details, see the Grant Guidelines:

The Fiscal Year 2018 Community Policing Development (CPD) Program is a competitive solicitation, open to all public governmental agencies, for-profit and nonprofit organizations, institutions of higher education, community groups, and faith-based organizations.

About the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS Office)

The Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS Office) is the component of the U.S. Department of Justice responsible for advancing the practice of community policing by the nation’s state, local, territorial, and tribal law enforcement agencies through information and grant resources.

More

Grant Deadline

Grant applications are due no later than 11:59 p.m. EST, June 7, 2018.

Apply

Apply for the COPS Community Policing Development (CPD) Program

Needs and Capabilities Assessment: Why and How Do We Accomplish This?

Needs Assessment

There is an old saying that floats about and holds a special truth not only in how we conduct our daily operations, but also in how we go about applying to grant funding sources. That saying is:

“If You Fail to Plan, You Can Plan to Fail!”

Proper planning involves a myriad of things, one of which is assuring that you have proper manpower and equipment to carry out your basic mission for your citizens.

Get the facts of what you need to know about your department’s ability to respond to incidents

One of the tools that you should be using in that planning is a needs and capabilities assessment. It is one of the first things that you need to do, especially if you are the Chief of the Department.

This report is what gives you the facts you need to know about how well prepared your department is to carry out its primary function, whether that be a Fire/EMS or Law Enforcement agency. It gives you a “State of the Union” report, so to speak, about your department.

So, just exactly what is a “Needs and Capabilities Assessment,” and how do we go about doing one?

Inventory all the equipment the department has

The first thing to do is a complete inventory of all equipment the department has. This inventory should include the following:

Personal Protective Equipment

  • What is your PPE? Whether that be structural turnout gear, wildland gear, ballistic protection equipment, or specialty haz-mat suits, inventory and assess all PPE
  • How many coats, pants, fire hoods, boots, helmets, goggles, gloves, etc., do you have?
  • What are the ages of each piece?
  • When was it purchased and to what national standard/edition does it comply with?
  • What is the condition of the equipment exactly?
  • How do you clean and repair it?
  • Where is it stored it when not in use?

Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus

  • How many SCBA sets do you have?
  • Describe them well?
  • When were they purchased?
  • How many spare bottles do you have, and what is their age and NFPA standard/edition of compliance?
  • When are your bottles going to expire?
  • How many facemasks do you have? When were they purchased, and to what standard/edition do they comply?
  • What is wrong, exactly, with the SCBA or bottles?
  • How much money have you expended in the past 2 years repairing or inspecting these bottles?
  • Do you have a compressor-fill station to fill bottles with? How old is it? What is it costing you to maintain? If you don’t have one how do you fill your bottles now?

Hoses

  • Do you have enough hose to meet NFPA1901 compliance on each apparatus?
  • What hose testing have you done, and what were the results?
  • How much hose has been taken out of service and needs to be replaced?
  • What size and lengths are needed?
  • What appliances or nozzles and attachments do you have? What is wrong with them?
  • Are your hoses compatible with surrounding mutual aid departments?

Apparatus/Vehicles

  • You should obtain a complete list of each apparatus by year of manufacture, manufacturer, pump and tank size.
  • Number of seat belted positions?
  • Number of SCBA carried onboard?
  • Mileage, hours on pumps and engines?
  • How much money in maintenance has been spent during last 2-3 years?
  • Is each apparatus passing its tech inspection for pumping capacity or aerial operations?
  • Are they all properly equipped with emergency lighting and properly marked to NFPA standards?

Miscellaneous Tools

  • How many vent saws, PPV fans, ceiling tools, flappers, axes, pike poles, ladders, hydraulic rescue tools, generators and scene lighting equipment do you have?
  • What condition are these tools in?

Assess all personnel, training, and certifications

The next thing in completing the Needs and Capabilities Assessment involves personnel.

  • How many members do you have?
  • How many are active FFs?
  • How many are strictly support staffs or fire police?
  • How many are trained to the equivalent of or certified at FF1 and FF2?
  • What about EMTs?
  • How many hold dual certification, and to what level?
  • Are all of your people compliant with NIMS?
  • How do you staff?

Facilities

  • What about your station houses?
  • How many stations do you have?
  • How are they staffed?
  • What is the condition of each?
  • Do any need major repairs? If so, how much is it anticipated to cost to repair?
  • Do you have living quarters in them?
  • Do they have an auxiliary emergency generator supporting them?
  • Do they have Vehicle Exhaust Removal Systems?
  • Are they ADA compliant?
  • Do they need expansion in terms of living space, admin offices, training rooms, wellness and fitness rooms etc.?

Call Volume & Incident Response

Next, you need to do an analysis of the past three years of your department’s call volumes.

  • Are you seeing increases in certain areas and why?
  • Are you staying level with call volume, or are you increasing or decreasing?
  • What kind of critical infrastructure are you exposed to exactly?
  • How much mutual aid are you calling for or responding for?

What to do once you have the data

Once you have gone through these questions and gathered the data for them, you should be able to sit down and do a comprehensive report delineating data and statistics for them all. This now becomes a planning tool not only in budgetary matters, but in looking toward the future operations of the department. It also becomes a sheet you can turn to in deciding what you might need to be asking for in your grant applications.

Knowing where shortcomings are helps you to develop a “wants vs. needs” list, and there is a distinct difference between the two.

A “wants” list is items or equipment which would make your tasks easier to perform or give you additional capabilities, but it is not a critical piece of equipment for you to perform your basic mission tasks. It’s good to know what your department wants, but wants won’t help you get grants.

Identify the needs and seek grants to fill those needs

When you are dealing with federal grant programs, you want to be looking at your “needs” list and seeing which items or equipment on that list are listed as a priority of the funding source to whom you are applying for.

Most of the federal grant programs (including AFG, FP&S and SAFER) pretty much require you to make your request based upon the results of a “Needs and Capabilities” study you have either had prepared or accomplished on your own.

When you read the RFP/NOFO of the grant program, it will always spell out what priority certain requests will have. Never go for anything other than a high priority on any grant program if you expect to be successful. This is where the document you are producing comes in really handy, as it will allow you to prioritize the wants and needs on your list according to what the program funding source’s priorities are.

Although it might seem like the proverbial pain in the backside to do, once you’ve completed your needs assessment it can be a guidance document for you in many different decisions involved in efficient and safe operations for your department. Having completed a needs assessment can also increase your likelihood of being funded, by assuring that you have formed the proper nexus between your needs and that of the program funding source. Many grant programs will give higher priority to those requests that are submitted based upon a “Needs and Capabilities” assessment.