BJA FY2017 Body-Worn Camera Policy and Implementation Program

Deadline: Feb. 16, 2017

Website

Grant Guidelines (PDF)

BJA FY2017 Body-Worn Camera Policy and Implementation Program – Law Enforcement – First Responder Grants : http://firstrespondergrants.com/frg_grants/grant_view/grant/236

$17,000,000 for Law Enforcement Body Worn Cameras (BWCs)

Individual agency awards up to $1,000,000

The FY2017 Body Worn Camera (BWC) Policy and Implementation Program will support the implementation, including the purchase, deployment, maintenance, data storage, and policy development of a body-worn camera program, and the necessary policies for law enforcement agencies. The program will play a critical role in the creation, implementation, and evaluation of problem solving approaches that incorporate BWCs into officer practice in selected jurisdictions.

BJA is soliciting applications from law enforcement agencies to develop a comprehensive, problem-solving approach that incorporates BWCs into officer practice by implementing a first-time program or enhancing an existing BWC program that includes the following elements:

  • Implementation of a BWC program developed in a planned and phased approach that first achieves broad stakeholder, local political leadership, and community engagement, and then leverages partnership input to address policy, training, deployment, and procurement requirements.
  • Implementation of appropriate privacy policies that, at a minimum, address BWC program issues involving civil rights, domestic violence, juveniles, and victims’ groups, and legal liabilities of release of information.
  • Implementation of operational procedures and tracking mechanisms that address the use, review, access, storage, retention, redaction, and expungement of digital voice and audio evidence.
  • Training of officers, administrators, and associated agencies requiring access to
    digital multimedia evidence (DME).

What this grant does for your agency

Successful applicants will develop and implement policies and practices required for effective program adoption, and will address program factors including the purchase, deployment, and maintenance of camera systems and equipment; data storage and access; and privacy considerations. BJA expects the BWC programs to make a positive impact on the quality of policing in these jurisdictions and to inform national efforts to improve the use of BWCs more broadly. While BWC equipment may be purchased under this program, successful applicants must demonstrate a commitment and adherence to a strong BWC policy framework, including comprehensive policy adoption and requisite training.

Agencies awarded the BJA FY2017 Body-Worn Camera Policy and Implementation Program receive grants as follows

  • Category 1: Implementation or Expansion of BWC Programs for Small Agencies. Seeks to establish new or expand existing BWC programs in police agencies with 25 or fewer sworn officers. Applicants may request no more than $50,000 under this category. BJA estimates 40 awards will be made in this category for an estimated total amount of $2,000,000. There is a minimum request of $10,000 for this category. If an agency does not require this level of funding they are encouraged to partner with other criminal justice agencies to combine projects and have one of the agencies act as the applicant while the partner agencies act as subrecipients. This category is not restricted by the $1,500 camera metric, though peer reviewers and BJA will consider the cost ratio of requested funds to the number of body-worn cameras.
  • Category 2: Implementation or Expansion of BWC Programs for Mid-Sized Agencies. Seeks to establish new or expand existing BWC programs in mid-sized
    police agencies with more than 25 sworn officers and up to 250 sworn officers. Applicants may request no more than $400,000 under this category. BJA estimates 10 awards will be made in this category for an estimated total amount of $4,000,000. Applicants for this category may request no more than $1,500 for each camera to be deployed in this phase of their BWC program, up to the agency size funding limitations. Though funds are correlated to the number of cameras, awarded funds may also be used for any part of the BWC program other than line-item data storage costs, which can only be covered with matching funds. BWC systems that are bundled or sold as software-as-a-service (SAAS) with no line-item distinction to data storage costs are permissible for award funding.
  • Category 3: Implementation or Expansion of BWC Programs for Large Agencies. Seeks to establish new or expand existing BWC programs in large police agencies with more than 250 and up to 1,000 sworn officers. Eight awards are anticipated, and applicants may request no more than $750,000 for an estimated total amount of $6,000,000 under this category. Applicants for this category may request no more than $1,500 for each camera to be deployed in this phase of their BWC program, up to the agency size funding limitations. Though funds are correlated to the number of cameras, awarded funds may also be used for any part of the BWC program other than line-item data storage
    costs, which can only be covered with matching funds. BWC systems that are bundled
    or sold as software-as-a-service (SAAS) with no line-item distinction to data storage
    costs are permissible for award funding.
  • Category 4: Implementation or Expansion of BWC Programs for Extra-Large Agencies. Seeks to establish new or expand existing BWC programs in extra-large
    police agencies with more than 1,000 sworn officers. Five awards are anticipated, and applicants may request no more than $1,000,000 for an estimated total of $5,000,000 under this category. Applicants for this category may request no more than $1,500 for each camera to be deployed in this phase of their BWC program, up to the agency size funding limitations. Though funds are correlated to the number of cameras, awarded funds may also be used for any part of the BWC program other than line-item data storage costs, which can only be covered with matching funds. BWC systems that are bundled or sold as software-as-a-service (SAAS) with no line-item distinction to data storage costs are permissible for award funding.
  • Note: $1,500 is not the expected cost of a body-worn camera. Paired with the matching funds, it is the expected total program costs for one (1) camera system to include: Camera, Storage, Software, Licenses, Services, Policy Development, Training, etc.

Only a limited number of grants will be awarded.

Grant Eligibility

For full eligibility details, see the Grant Guidelines:

  • County governments
  • State governments
  • Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
  • City or township governments.

About the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA)

BJA’s mission is to provide leadership and services in grant administration and criminal justice policy development to support local, state, and tribal justice strategies to achieve safer communities. BJA supports programs and initiatives in the areas of law enforcement, justice information sharing, countering terrorism, managing offenders, combating drug crime and abuse, adjudication, advancing tribal justice, crime prevention, protecting vulnerable populations, and capacity building. More

Grant Deadline

Grant applications are due no later than 11:59 p.m. EST, Thurs., Feb. 16, 2016.

Apply

Funding Opportunity Number: BJA-2017-11221. Apply for the BJA FY2017 Body-Worn Camera Policy and Implementation Program

Application Period for the FY 2016 Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response (SAFER) Grants is Coming Soon

Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response (SAFER) GrantsThe FY 2016 SAFER application period is right around the corner. The open application period dates will be released as soon as the information becomes available.

Start planning your FY 2016 SAFER Grant application now by reviewing the technical assistance tools below. These tools were produced specifically to help potential applicants begin to plan their 2016 applications ahead of the application period. The tools can be viewed on the AFG website or downloaded to your computer.

  • Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO) – COMING SOON
  • FY 2016 SAFER Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
  • FY 2016 Application Checklist: This checklist will help you prepare your SAFER grant application
  • FY 2016 Self-Evaluation – Hiring of Firefighters: Career, combination, and volunteer fire departments
  • FY 2016 Self-Evaluation – Recruitment and Retention – Fire Departments: Combination and volunteer fire departments
  • FY 2016 Self-Evaluation – Recruitment and Retention – Interest Organizations
    National, State, Local, or Tribal Volunteer Firefighters Interest Organizations

SAFER Grants Help Desk: If you have questions about the technical assistance tools listed below, call the toll-free number at 1-866-274-0960; or send email questions to [email protected].

SAM.gov Registration is Required to Apply and Receive Grants

The FY 2016 SAFER application period will be here before you know it. All eligible applicants must be registered and active in the System for Award Management (SAM) before you can submit an application. Per 2 CFR § 25.205, FEMA may not make an award to an entity until the entity has complied with the requirements to provide a valid DUNS number and maintain an active SAM.gov registration with current information. SAM.gov consolidates federal procurement systems and the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA).

To register, or validate your information, please visit: https://www.sam.gov/portal/public/SAM/

SAM.gov Registration Tips: Please ensure the following items are current in SAM and the DUNS number used in SAM is the same one you use for all FEMA applications:

  • Organization’s name
  • Address
  • Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS)
  • Employer Identification Number (EIN)
  • Banking information (type of account (checking or saving), routing number, and account number
  • Many websites may look official in appearance but are not. As a reminder, registration in the SAM.gov is FREE
  • SAM.gov registration is only active for one year and must be renewed annually.
    FEMA has prepared a technical assistance document, the SAM.gov Get Ready Guide. This document is designed to walk you through the SAM.gov registration process
  • This information should be consistent in all registration documents

Should you need assistance with your SAM.gov account, there are several ways to get
help:

  • Submit your SAM.gov question online to the Federal Service Help Desk at https://www.fsd.gov/fsd-gov/home.do
  • Call the Federal Service Help Desk toll free at 866-606-8220
  • SAM Quick Start Guide For New Grantee Registration and SAM Video Tutorial for New Applicants are tools created by the General Services Administration to assist those registering with the System for Award Management (SAM).

If you have questions or concerns about your SAM.gov registration, please contact the Federal Support desk at https://www.fsd.gov

Prepare Communities for Complex Coordinated Terrorist Attacks (CCTA) Grants Program

FEMA - Federal Emergency Management Agency

Prepare for Emerging Threats and Hazards

Grant Website & Guidelines

Deadline: Feb. 10, 2017

$35.94 Million in Grants to Prevent and Prepare for Terrorist Attacks

The FY2016 Complex Coordinated Terrorist Attacks (CCTA) Program provides $35.94 million to local, state, tribal, and territorial jurisdictions for improving their ability to prepare for, prevent, and respond to complex coordinated terrorist attacks in collaboration with the whole community.

What this grant does for your agency

The FY2016 CCTA Program intends to enhance resilience and build capacity for jurisdictions to address complex coordinated terrorist attacks that may occur across the nation. Following a competitive process, selected local, state, tribal, and territorial jurisdictions will receive funding specifically to build and sustain capabilities to enhance their preparedness for complex coordinated terrorist attacks, to include the following components:

  • Identifying capability gaps
  • Developing and/or updating plans
  • Training to implement plans and procedures, and
  • Conducting exercises to validate capabilities.

The FY 2016 CCTA Program will prioritize projects that incorporate the following
factors:

  • Develop comprehensive and sustainable approaches to enhance preparedness for
    complex coordinated terrorist attacks.
  • Develop and advance regional partnerships and whole community collaboration.
  • Promote creative, innovative, and replicable approaches to preparing for complex
    coordinated terrorist attacks.
  • Develop and share lessons learned and best practices associated with preparing for
    complex coordinated terrorist attacks between jurisdictions.

Agencies awarded the Prepare Communities for Complex Coordinated Terrorist Attacks (CCTA) receive funding up to $2,500,000.

Awards will be made on a competitive basis to applicants who present an ability to successfully meet the requirements described in the NOFO. FEMA encourages interested jurisdictions of various types, sizes, and capabilities to apply. The projected number of awards is 25-30, with a period of performance of 36 months.

Grant Eligibility

For full eligibility details, see the Grant Guidelines:

  • Local governments (as defined by 2 C.F.R. § 200.64)
  • State governments (includes all 56 states and territories, which includes any state of the United States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands)
  • Federally-recognized Tribal governments

About the FEMA Protection and National Preparedness (PNP)

Protection and National Preparedness (PNP) is responsible for the coordination of preparedness and protection related activities throughout FEMA, including grants, planning, training, exercises, individual and community preparedness, assessments, lessons learned, continuity of government and national capital region coordination. More

Grant Deadline

Grant applications are due no later than 11:59 p.m. EST, Fri., Feb. 10, 2017.

Apply

Funding Opportunity Number: DHS-16-NPD-133-00-01. Apply for the Prepare Communities for Complex Coordinated Terrorist Attacks (CCTA)

3 steps to get ready for 2017 grants

Get ahead of the game

It’s time to look ahead to next year. How will your department bridge funding gaps, and acquire critical training and equipment?

Plan. Learn. Train. Here are 3 steps you can take now to get ready for 2017 grants.

Step 1: Plan

What grants will your department go for?

Every year, grants are available from public, private, corporate, and non-profit providers, and those funds can benefit Law Enforcement Agencies like yours.

Take Action

  • Review our list of available Law Enforcement Grants
  • Bookmark programs your agency should try for
  • Review each grant and its requirements
  • Do the work, write the application, and get it done

Step 2: Learn

Solid data and a strong narrative make a big difference.

Just as you need solid evidence to build a good case, grants need solid data and a strong narrative to give you a competitive shot at a program. We maintain comprehensive lists of data and statistical resources plus government websites that you can turn to get that critical information.

Take Action

  • Understand the grant’s requirements
  • Review our resources for the sites you need
  • Pull the data into your application and narrative
  • Follow the rules of the grant

Step 3: Train

Get the training to get the gear.

Whether you are writing your first or your hundredth grant, there is always more to learn and improve. Grants can also be confusing, but solid, “meat and potatoes,” down-to-earth plain-talk training can give you the skills and confidence you need to tackle any grant.

Take Action

  • Discuss with your superiors and administrators how grant-writing training can help your agency
  • Review available resources
  • Check our National Training schedule or take our Online Grant-Writing Course on your schedule and wherever you are

Good luck with 2017 grants!

GRANT ALERT: 2 fire grants to try for this month

Fire equipment grants and fire prevention grants

November is a good month to try for fire grants. Here are the 2 you need to check out.

FY2016 Assistance to Firefighters Grant (AFG)

America’s Largest Fire Grant Program

2,500 awards projected to protect Firefighters, EMS and the public against fire hazards. The purpose of the AFG Program is to enhance the safety of the public and firefighters with respect to fire and fire-related hazards by providing direct financial assistance to eligible fire departments, nonaffiliated EMS organizations, and State Fire Training Academies (SFTA) for critically needed resources to equip and train emergency personnel to recognized standards, enhance operational efficiencies, foster interoperability, and support community resilience.

Deadline: November 18, 2016

FM Global Fire Prevention Grant Program

Funding for Fire Prevention, Preparedness & Control Efforts

FM Global offers fire grants to organizations working to combat fire. Through their Fire Prevention Grant Program, fire departments and brigades, as well as national, state, regional, local, and community organizations are eligible.

Deadline: November 30, 2016

GRANT ALERT – 3 law enforcement grants to try for this month

Training. Body Armor. K9.

Training. Body Armor. K9. November is a good month to try for grants. Here are 3 you need to check out.

BJA NTTAC Training and Technical Assistance Grant Service

Law Enforcement Training & Corrections Training

BJA provides training and technical assistance services in the following areas: Adjudication, Corrections, Counter-Terrorism, Crime Prevention, Information Sharing, Law Enforcement, Mental Health, or Substance Abuse.

Apply on an ongoing basis

Working Dog Foundation K-9 Grants

New Hampshire, Maine & Massachusetts Law Enforcement Agencies

The Working Dog Foundation provides monetary grants to help fund K-9 programs in New Hampshire, Maine, and Massachusetts.

Apply on an ongoing basis

North Carolina League of Municipalities Body Armor Grants

Body Armor for North Carolina Police Officers

For those participating in the RMS workers compensation program, the pool will help pay the cost of providing body armor for police officers. The workers compensation program will pay 50 percent of the cost, up to $250 for qualified purchases.

Apply on an ongoing basis

Kurt’s 5 Fire Grant Tips for FY2016 AFG

With a $310,500,000 awards pool, America’s largest fire grant program, the FY2016 Assistance to Firefighters Grant (AFG), is open for applications Oct. 11-Nov. 18. AFG is expected to make 2,500 fire grant awards to protect firefighters, EMS and the public against fire hazards.

But with thousands of applications vying for this pool of grant money, how can your grant stand out from the pack? Kurt Bradley, Senior Grant Consultant for First Responder Grants, has these 5 tips:

Bring your A-game

Money is the same as last year, which will mean it’s going to be a very competitive grant. Your application and narrative will need solid data and a strong need to help it stand out from the pack.

There is very little funding for Vehicle Acquisitions

Out of the 2,050 applications funded under FY2015 AFG, only about 160 were for Vehicle Acquisition fire grants. Only 25% of total AFG money can go to vehicles, and AFG has pledged 10% of that money to ambulances. That gives you an effective 15% of the total AFG money going for new apparatus.

Since the grant money is now so low when it comes to replacing apparatus, and since so few apparatus are being funded, departments are wise to have a Plan B in mind for replacing their apparatus. AFG is a real long shot right now to win a vehicle. If you need apparatus, look at non-AFG ways to fund it, and focus your AFG application on a higher-priority need.

Alternatively, if you really need a vehicle, your application must scream and bleed with the urgency of your need.

High-priority projects only

There is absolutely no sense in writing your grant around a project that is rated as “low or medium.” Plain and simple, it will not get funded. Focus only on high-priority projects. Your grant will be far more competitive.

Haven’t won AFG in a while? That could help you

Departments not having received a grant in at least 3 years will earn extra points. That could help your application move up the ranks and increase your likelihood of getting funded.

Micro-grants are still a very good option.

FY2015 AFG saw many “micro-grants” under $10,000. These micro-grants are a good way to fund high-priority but lower-dollar projects. If the need is great but the cost is smaller than, say, replacing apparatus or procuring dozens of sets of PPE, write the grant and make a strong case.

FY2016 Assistance to Firefighters Grant (AFG)

Assistance to Firefighters Grants (AFG)America’s Largest Fire Grant Program: $310,500,000 Awards Pool

Grant Website

Grant Guidance

2,500 Awards Projected to Protect Firefighters, EMS & The Public Against Fire Hazards

Opens: Tues., Oct. 11, 2016, 8 a.m. EST
Closes: Fri., Nov. 18, 2016, 5 p.m. EST

The primary goal of the Assistance to Firefighters Grant (AFG) is to meet the firefighting and emergency response needs of fire departments and nonaffiliated emergency medical service organizations. Since 2001, AFG has helped firefighters and other first responders to obtain critically needed equipment, protective gear, emergency vehicles, training and other resources needed to protect the public and emergency personnel from fire and related hazards. AFG has 3 activities, each with its own eligibility requirements:

  • Operations and Safety
  • Vehicle Acquisition
  • Regional Projects

The purpose of the AFG Program is to enhance the safety of the public and firefighters with respect to fire and fire-related hazards by providing direct financial assistance to eligible fire departments, nonaffiliated EMS organizations, and State Fire Training Academies (SFTA) for critically needed resources to equip and train emergency personnel to recognized standards, enhance operational efficiencies, foster interoperability, and support community resilience.

In awarding grants, the Administrator of FEMA shall consider the following:

  • The findings and recommendations of the Technical Evaluation Panel (TEP)
  • The degree to which an award will reduce deaths, injuries, and property damage by reducing the risks associated with fire related and other hazards
  • The extent of an applicant’s need for an AFG grant and the need to protect the United States as a whole

The AFG Program supports the basic mission of strengthening national preparedness and resilience, and addresses the following “Core Capabilities” of the National Preparedness Goal:

  • Fire Management and Suppression
  • Environmental Response/Health and Safety
  • Threats and Hazards Identification
  • Public Health, Healthcare, and Emergency Medical Services
  • Operational Coordination
  • Operational Communications
  • Mass Search and Rescue Operations
  • Community Resilience
  • Long-term Vulnerability Reduction

Kurt Bradley’s Tips for FY2016 AFG

Bring your A-game

Money is the same as last year, which will mean it’s going to be a very competitive grant. Your application and narrative will need solid data and a strong need to help it stand out from the pack.

There is very little funding for Vehicle Acquisitions

Out of the 2,050 applications funded under FY2015 AFG, only about 160 were for Vehicle Acquisition fire grants. Only 25% of total AFG money can go to vehicles, and AFG has pledged 10% of that money to ambulances. That gives you an effective 15% of the total AFG money going for new apparatus.

Since the grant money is now so low when it comes to replacing apparatus, and since so few apparatus are being funded, departments are wise to have a Plan B in mind for replacing their apparatus. AFG is a real long shot right now to win a vehicle. If you need apparatus, look at non-AFG ways to fund it, and focus your AFG application on a higher-priority need.

Alternatively, if you really need a vehicle, your application must scream and bleed with the urgency of your need.

High-priority projects only

There is absolutely no sense in writing your grant around a project that is rated as “low or medium.” Plain and simple, it will not get funded. Focus only on high-priority projects. Your grant will be far more competitive.

Haven’t won AFG in a while? That could help you

Departments not having received a grant in at least 3 years will earn extra points. That could help your application move up the ranks and increase your likelihood of getting funded.

Micro-grants are still a very good option.

FY2015 AFG saw many “micro-grants” under $10,000. These micro-grants are a good way to fund high-priority but lower-dollar projects. If the need is great but the cost is smaller than, say, replacing apparatus or procuring dozens of sets of PPE, write the grant and make a strong case.

Important reminders for your AFG fire grant application

  • Eligible departments can reduce their cost share through the AFG Economic Hardship Waiver Policy. Organizations can request a waiver or reduction of non-federal funds cost share requirement, maintenance of effort requirement, or both, in cases of demonstrated economic hardship (an “Economic Hardship Waiver”). This guidance provides the minimum requirements for eligibility to request an Economic Hardship Waiver and how to request one.
  • AFG awardees must procure contracts in a specified manner. AFG’s Procurement Integrity video provides an overview of proper contract procurement for grantees
  • Time zone matters! The closing date and time to receive applications is Nov. 18, 2016, at 5:00 p.m. EST. Those of you in CST, MST, or PST time zones, please take note and adjust your submission time accordingly. 5 p.m. ET is 4 p.m. CST, 3 p.m. MST, and 2 p.m. PST.
  • Make sure your application “checks the checkboxes” of what the Administrator of FEMA is looking for:
    • Competitive enough application and demonstrated need that satisfies the Technical Evaluation Panel (TEP);
    • To what degree your request can reduce deaths, injuries, and property damage by reducing the risks associated with fire related and other hazards; and
    • The extent of your need for an AFG grant, and how fulfilling your need protects not only your jurisdiction, but the United States as a whole. This is where critical infrastructure and regional projects and inter-departmental cooperation come into play big time—it shows you’re “looking beyond your own backyard.”

What this grant does for your agency

$310,500,000 Fire Grant Funding Available

  • Projected Number of Awards: 2,500
  • Period of Performance: 12 months from the date of award
  • Projected Period of Performance Start Date: Mar. 3, 2017
  • Projected Period of Performance End Date: Mar. 3, 2018

Agencies awarded the FY2016 Assistance to Firefighters Grant (AFG) receive funds to protect the health and safety of the public and their emergency response personnel.

Only a limited number of grants will be awarded.

Grant Eligibility

  • Fire Departments: Fire departments operating in any of the 56 states, which include any state of the United States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, the US Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico; or, any federally recognized Indian tribe or tribal organization, are eligible applicants. A Fire department is an agency or organization having a formally recognized arrangement with a state, territory, local, or tribal authority (city, county, parish, fire district, township, town, or other governing body) to provide fire suppression to a population within a geographically fixed primary first due response area.
  • Nonaffiliated EMS organizations: Nonaffiliated EMS organizations operating in any of the 56 states, which include any state of the United States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, the US Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico; or, any federally recognized Indian tribe or tribal organization, are eligible applicants. A nonaffiliated EMS organization is an agency or organization that is a public or private nonprofit emergency medical services entity providing medical transport that is not affiliated with a hospital and does not serve a geographic area in which emergency medical services are adequately provided by a fire department.
  • State Fire Training Academies: A State Fire Training Academy (SFTA) operating in any of the 56 states, which includes any state of the United States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico is an eligible applicant. Applicants must be designated either by legislation or by a Governor’s declaration as the sole state fire service training agency within a state. The designated SFTA shall be the only State agency/bureau/division, or entity within that State, to be an eligible AFG SFTA applicant.

About the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)

FEMA’s mission is to support citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards. More

Grant Deadline

Grant applications are due no later than 5 p.m. EST, Fri., Nov. 18, 2016.

Apply

Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number: 97.044. Notice of Funding Opportunity Number: DHS-16-GPD-044-00-99. Apply for the FY2016 Assistance to Firefighters Grant (AFG)

Congress Approves Continuing Resolution (CFSI)

From Congressional Fire Services Institute (CFSI)

Congressional Fire Services Institute (CFSI)On Wednesday, September 28th, both the House and Senate approved H.R. 5325, a 10-week continuing resolution funding the federal government through December 9, 2016. In addition to continuing funding for the federal government at current levels, the legislation includes full Fiscal Year 2017 funding for military construction and veterans’ programs. The bill also contains $1.1 billion in funding to respond to the Zika virus and $500 million to assist flood victims in Louisiana and other affected states.

Congress has adjourned until after the November Presidential election. Following the election, both chambers will return for a “lame-duck” session and are expected to complete work on the Fiscal Year 2017 funding bills. Full story

$4,535,589 Fire Grants Awarded in Round 9 FY2015 Staffing for Adequate Fire & Emergency Response (SAFER) Grants

Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response (SAFER) Grants

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has announced 14 Round 9 awards for the FY2015 Staffing for Adequate Fire & Emergency Response (SAFER). The previous award round, Round 8, was announced Sept. 9, 2016. Fire Service organizations receiving hiring fire grant awards and recruitment fire grant awards totaling $4,535,589 include:

  • $96,820, Recruitment, Village of Island Park Fire Department, Island Park, NY
  • $133,659, Hiring, Dudley Fire and Emergency Service, Dudley, MA
  • $176,900, Recruitment, Lewisburg Volunteer Fire Department, Lewisburg, WV
  • $190,401, Recruitment, Oktibbeha County District #5 Vol FD, Starkville, MS
  • $225,611, Recruitment, CAMPOBELLO, CAMPOBELLO, SC
  • $346,347, Hiring, City of Branson Fire & Rescue, Branson, MO
  • $459,344, Recruitment, Hallock Volunteer Fire Department, Hallock, MN
  • $527,473, Recruitment, North Collier Fire Control and Rescue District, Naples, FL
  • $633,746, Recruitment, Bardstown Fire Department, Bardstown, KY
  • $935,716, Hiring, Stratford Fire Department, Stratford, CT

Further award rounds will be announced on Fridays until SAFER has made all awards under the current year. Due to continued application scoring or other circumstances, some weeks may not have an award round. See all FY2015 SAFER fire grant awards